Milly Wastie

Regional Manager (East Midlands) for the Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (R.A.B.I) and National Federation of Young Farmers’ Clubs (NFYFC) Chairman

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NAME Milly Wastie JOB Regional Manager COMPANY R.A.B.I AGE 28 SALARY* *industry average

What do you do day-to-day in your job?

I oversee the fundraising, marketing and communications for the National Farming Charity across Northamptonshire, Leicestershire, Rutland, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Lincolnshire.

R.A.B.I provides financial and practical assistance to farmers, farm workers and their families during times of need, hardship and distress.

Each day is different and there is a lot of diversity within my role.  I get to manage six voluntary county committees, made up of farmers, business professionals and young people,  to make sure they provide a varied range of fundraising events to suit a diverse audience.  I work to increase awareness of the charity via regional media (TV, radio and written) to increase referrals and promote upcoming events.

I seek new opportunities with corporates who work directly with the farming community.  I aim to provide them with new and fun ways of getting involved with the charity’s campaigns and sponsored events.  

I get to work with community groups, such as the Rotary and Women’s Institute, to promote the charity, encourage more to get involved and gain funding.  I also regularly attend agricultural shows and events to promote campaigns, raise funds, interact with general public, network with industry leaders and potential supporters.

What have you done in the past?

In the past, I worked for other charitable organisations, as well as in the service industry waitressing, working in bars and hairdressing between my studies.

What qualifications do you have?

GCSE’s: A-C grade; A levels; NVQ3 in Business Administration; and a BA (Hons) Business and Management. What I would also say is that experience also counts and I have been able to pursue my career through opportunities I have created within volunteering and working hard.

Did you consider other career choices?

Being involved with young farmers helped me to shape my career path.  There are over 600 young farmers clubs across England and Wales, set up for rural young people between 10 and 26 which help provide opportunities such as training, competitions and a social life. We weren’t given great careers advice at school, so it was my surrounding environment that inspired me to want to work in agriculture and the encouragement from my Grandfather.

I’m not from a farming background, but I grew up in a rural area. All my friends are involved in the diverse agricultural sector too!


What do you enjoy the most about your job?

My job is incredibly rewarding!  It is a very enjoyable and sociable job working with a whole host of people from volunteers, businesses to groups and organisations. Ultimately the work that I do benefits those who are experiencing difficult times, so I know that my hard work will allow the charity to distribute more funds to support those in need.

What don’t you like?

It’s hard to say what I don’t like.  Although, it’s difficult to say no when I’ve got so much on, and you still want to encourage and support people. The parameters of my job are also vast and as I work from home it can be difficult to shut the office door at night.  I also socialise with the same groups of people who support the charity and the events I run.

On the other hand, working from home enables me to effectively cover my region with my local knowledge. Although, the role is very ‘hands on’ and I’m the face of the organisations for my area, so I need to be seen out and about often.


What Qualifications do you have?

GCSE’s: A-C grade; A levels; NVQ3 in Business Administration; and a BA (Hons) Business and Management. What I would also say is that experience also counts and I have been able to pursue my career through opportunities I have created within volunteering and working hard.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years time?

On the farm with my partner (who runs the family farm of beef, sheep and arable) with a few children in tow shaping our future together. Thanks to the support of the Lord Plumb foundation, a grant giving organisation that helps young people wanting to get set up within agriculture, I have been given an opportunity to research, communicate and add value to rare breed pig meat.

I’m hoping to go on butchery courses, have some pigs and make sausages and air dried ham.

I see myself as a communicator within the industry and am passionate about agriculture and British produce.

What one tip would you give to someone wanting to get into the farming and food supply industry?

Take time to learn from others. Don’t expect people to hand things to you on a plate. You have to work hard to fulfil your dream and there are lots of hurdles / lessons to be learnt along the way.

However, it’s a fun journey and if you immerse yourself in the positive aspects of agriculture and share a passion, then you will get out of it what you put in.

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